Dangerous And Shocking Ingredients Hidden In Your Foods

As a qualified personal trainer and health coach, I’ve evaluated a lot of diets and meal plans over the years. I always ask “So what is your diet like?” And the most common response is… “Oh, my diet’s pretty good actually.” It’s not until we delve deeper into what people are consuming on a daily basis where we start to realize that their diet wasn’t that healthy after all.

The food companies certainly don’t make it easy. Most of the food labels don’t make much sense due to all the codes and unpronounceable names. But did you know that there are legal loopholes where manufacturers can add certain ingredients and chemicals to the product, but state on the label that the product doesn’t contain those ingredients at all? Ridiculous isn’t it!

Anti-Freeze

Yes, you read correctly… Anti-freeze is what goes into the radiator of your car so it won’t overheat but also won’t freeze up in colder climates. It’s called propylene glycol, also known as propane-1,2-diol or E1520. It’s a chemical that has many industrial uses such as Corexit, which is an oil dispersant used for oil spills in the ocean. It’s also used in pharmaceutical drugs and cosmetics, right through to many ice creams.

Luckily for the folks in the European Union, they have not cleared propylene glycol as a food additive or food grade product. My advice, make your own ice cream and stop consuming products that contain this chemical.

Human Hair

Proteins are the building blocks of life and are made up of amino acids. Although they are good for your health, I’m sure you’d agree that there must be a better way to extend the shelf life of some products other than using human hair or duck feathers.

The amino-acid L-Cysteine is used to prolong the shelf life of many products such as commercial bread. The L-Cysteine that is used to prolong these foods often comes from duck and chicken feathers as well as horns from cows that have been slaughtered. However, the most commonly used version comes from human hair. Yes, you read that correctly.

Arsenic

Arsenic is a known carcinogen, which means that it causes cancer in living tissue. The unfortunate thing about this toxic element is that it seems to keep showing up in our food supplies. It’s in everything from breakfast cereals and rice, through to fruit juice and your drinking water. Sometimes at levels up to 2 – 3 times what is considered safe. It’s also been shown to be in many protein powders. Yes, you read that correctly as well… those expensive protein powders that many people waste their money on have been shown to contain this toxic element amongst others.

Anal Glands

Most people don’t realize that some of the flavors used in your favorite ice creams amongst other things, comes from the castor sacs of beavers, which is located at their rear end of the animal. This secretion is called castoreum and is used to mark the beaver’s territory. Due to the close proximity of the castor sacs to the beaver’s anal glands, castoreum can be a combination of urine, secretions from the castor glands as well as secretions from the anal glands.

Castoreum is used to flavor vanilla, raspberry, and strawberry ice cream and is a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved food additive in many popular ice cream brands. It’s also used to flavor many beverages such as protein and meal replacement drinks. You will generally find it labeled as “Natural Flavoring”. Isn’t that great, so for all you know, many of these so-called “natural” ingredients could be an anal secretion from other animals?

Borax

Borax has been banned as a food additive in Canada and the U.S. but is allowed in the European Union, even though they listed it as a substance of very high concern. It’s commonly used to make cosmetics, detergents, enamel glazes, fiberglass, as a flux in metallurgy and is used in fire retardants.

In the food industry, it’s known by its E number: E285. Borax is used for acidity control, firming agent, and preservative. It can be found in some caviars, noodles and depending on the region can be added a variety of dishes to add a firm texture.

Coal Tar

Doesn’t this one sound appetizing? No way! You might be thinking what on earth would coal tar be doing in food? Well, the good old processed foods industry is at it again.

It’s used in such things as road manufacturing, road, and pavement sealing coats, cosmetics, shampoos and pharmaceutical drugs.

In foods and beverages, it’s known as E102, Tartrazine or Yellow #5 and can be found in sodas, flavored chips, pickles, cheese flavored products as well as many other food and beverage items. This is just another reason to keep processed foods away from your body as well as those of your loved ones.

Rodent Hair

Would you like some rodent hair with that? I’m sure this is something that you usually sprinkle over your freshly made healthy meals.

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